Metalsmith jeweler Marlene Sabatina

Metalsmith jeweler Marlene Sabatina has been a part of the market since the beginning.

T

he Arizona Sage Art Market will bring together 30 artists from various mediums during its sixth annual event from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturday, Jan. 30. Admission to the market at The Holland Center is free.

Attendees can purchase art like paintings, jewelry and glass art at the indoor/outdoor market. At the event, 15% of the proceeds will go to The Holland Center to support its programming. 

According to Betsy Anderson, The Holland Center’s program and event manager, the event’s run has been a learning experience. Anderson has gone from volunteer to participant to manager. 

“There is nothing better than spending the day with artists and talking to them and talking to the people that come in,” Anderson said.

“I came up with this phrase that sort of epitomizes it: It’s like bringing Main Street shopping back to the art world. It’s about people actually coming and being able to have that one-on-one connection. It’s more than just buying; it’s a whole experience finding more out about art. We’re trying to bring Main Street back to the art world.”

Anderson said there will be 10 fewer participants than previous years to allow for social distancing between the different artists. Artists have their own area either inside the lobby or the large room within Holland Center or at an outside tent.

“We are trying to keep everybody spaced out,” Anderson said. “(Everyone) of course have to wear masks.”

In previous years, there was a Friday night showing prior to the Saturday event that will be canceled this year because they “are just not trying to socialize,” according to Anderson.

One of the participating artists is metalsmith jeweler Marlene Sabatina, who has been a part of the market since the beginning.

Sabatina and Anderson met years prior at a small breakfast artist group, and when Anderson was told about the show she asked Sabatina to join.

“The show is small and doesn’t seem expansive,” Sabatina said. “The amount and knowledge from artists and the breadth of work that is there. It’s pretty prolific for a small show.

“We can take time to look at each other’s pieces and get to know each other. Consequently, it becomes a cohesive group. It becomes a group that honors each other and can stay within a camaraderie within the arts.”

Sabatina began her metalsmith jewelry business more than 10 years ago and continues to make new items specifically for the Sage Art Market each year.

“I try not to go to my tried and true,” Sabatina said. “I probably have cases and cases of jewelry, so I try not to rely on that.”

She calls herself the “conundrum of the group” because she goes beyond her medium. 

“One of my loves is old vintage items, so I tend to bring in some of my vintagey things. Maybe it’s taking wire and creating something with an old vintage doorknob or various different things. 

“Usually, I have two pockets of jewelry. I have small pieces that are easy for all ages to pick up and then I have some vintage pieces or pieces that bring in found objects or something like that and set a show along with creating a small group of items that are nonjewelry items that are specific to the Sage Market.”

Sabatina will take a portion of her proceeds from the show and other sales this year and donate them to various organizations. This year Sabatina will help establish a suicide awareness foundation and create a specific piece for the nonprofit.

“My husband was a cancer survivor, and I do a compass jewelry line that is specifically done to bring awareness for different cancers,” Sabatina said.